Archive for the ‘USA’ Category

Nenana and the Alaskan North Pole

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FOR THE FULL STORY PLEASE GO TO : https://nytrips.wordpress.com/2018/09/16/alaska-nenana-and-a-north-pole/

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September 2015

(This is Part 3 of the Alaska series, please CLICK HERE for Part 2.)

As we reluctantly make our way out of amazing Denali northwards via Parks Highway (that’s the only road anyway), I look forward to our next stop — a small town called Nenana — with the hope of touching base with the legendary Alaska Railroad (ARR).

Nenana is a tiny town of less than 400 people, but was very important during the Fairbanks gold rush of the early 1900s. The town is a key supply and rest point for people traveling from the south to Fairbanks and back. It reminds me of the caravanserai along the Silk Road. The streets have cute names too, such as this A Street.

 

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FOR THE FULL STORY PLEASE GO TO : https://nytrips.wordpress.com/2018/09/16/alaska-nenana-and-a-north-pole/

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Visiting Denali but the ‘Tall One’ Hides

(This is Part 2 of the Alaska series, please CLICK HERE for Part 1.)

We are at Denali village, the gateway to the world famous Denali National Park, an American icon.  The morning starts with less-than-stellar weather as we make our way to the township at the entrance to this great national park. We are heading deep into the park, and snow is forecast. In summer this place would have been chock-a-block with visitors.

 

FOR FULL STORY, PLEASE GO TO: https://nytrips.wordpress.com/2018/09/13/alaska-denali-national-park/

 

 

FOR FULL STORY, PLEASE GO TO: https://nytrips.wordpress.com/2018/09/13/alaska-denali-national-park/

THANKS!

Leaving Anchorage and into the Alaskan Wilderness

Autumn of 2015, and we embark on another epic journey — a self-drive tour of Alaska, doing the Anchorage-Denali-Fairbanks-Glenallen-Seward-Anchorage loop, via Routes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 9 (not necessarily in that order) for a total distance of 1700km. The first part of the journey is the very scenic 400km leg from Anchorage (1) to Denali National Park (2).

 

FOR FULL STORY, PLEASE GO TO:  https://nytrips.wordpress.com/2018/09/13/alaska-anchorage-and-the-wilderness/

 

 

THANKS! 

New York City Walkabout

New York City

November 2013

In the last 20 years, I have travelled to New York City many times, but on quickie fly-in-fly-out business trips. A pity, since the city is designed to be walked and studied, comprising grid-like streets with simple intuitive names, and cheap efficient subway system, albeit a bit old and shabby at places. So now it looks like I am going to do what I have always wanted to do — roam NYC freely. But first thing’s first, a hearty breakfast for the long walkabout ahead.

We stay in Queens, a bit out of the way, closer to the John F Kennedy airport than downtown Manhattan, so a stroll to the nearest subway station is in order.

In Manhattan, street vendors are out in force, hawking odd curios …

… such as these typewritten movie scripts at $20 apiece.

At W 50th St, a rather upmarket restaurant, so we just gawk at the interesting facade and the hip people, no need to waste time on the menu.

And right opposite this fancy eatery is the famous Rockefeller Center — a complex of 19 commercial buildings built by the legendary Rockefeller family between 1930 and 1939.

An ice rink is at the heart of the Rockefeller Center, where a bronze-gilded statue sits, behind scaffolding now. Atop it, behind the yellow curtain, is the famed big Christmas Tree. Unfortunately it is not yet ready — it’s mid-November and obviously we are a tad too early for it.

In NYC, you can never go hungry even if you are on a budget. Food carts and trucks are everywhere, and a decent quick meal can be had for a few dollars. In many cases, they serve halal food as well, which is great for people like us.

The area around the Rockefeller Center is full of headquarters of well-known global corporations, such as this one along 6th Avenue (officially Avenue of the Americas).

A block to the west, something you won’t miss — the huge living neon displays of Times Square bombarding you with all sort of stuff 24/7. It’s part of the landscape, and people just blend in.

They have built a platform here, and people climb up the wide staircase to be assaulted left, right and centre, by the sights and sounds of the one and only Times Square. It does look very spectacular at night, I was here several years ago gulping my Starbucks on a cold evening. All the huge living neon billboards … amazing!

It’s quite an experience, surreal perhaps, to be immersed in this assault on your senses, which can be mesmerising. And don’t be shy to gape in awe … everybody does that here.

We reluctantly pull ourselves away from Time Square, and around the corner, another halal eatery. These guys seem to be everywhere.

We stroll northwards and soon hit Central Park, glorious in late fall colours. It’s mid-November and these leaves won’t probably last for another week or so.

Benches are everywhere, and most of them carry some sort of little memorial plaques — this one is especially cute.

At the eastern edge of Central Park there is the highly-regarded Metropolitan Museum of Art, the largest art museum in the USA, and in the world’s top ten. It’s the 3rd most popular museum in the world with 6.1mil visitors in 2012, behind Louvre and the British Museum. This Victorian Gothic facade was completed in the 1910s. Entry is via a donation of $25 (recommended) — so if you are thick-skinned you can just say, sorry, I’m not donating, at the ticket counter. Feeling half-charitable I opt to give $10/pax, which the lady gladly accepts, I think.

Regardless of its more than 2mil works, we are here for only one thing — Vincent van Gogh (hence the $10 offer above). And of course, VvG doesn’t disappoint with his wonderful “Irises” from 1890! On the other side, “First Steps, after Millet” from 1890. Aina, a fan, is ecstatic!

“Two Cut Sunflowers” from 1887, painted in Paris. There are 38 works by VvG in this museum — click HERE for the listing.

And his rare signature below the sunflowers.

This is Augustine, the wife of his good friend, the postmaster Roulin, when he was living in Arles (France) in 1888-89. (Read my story on the search for VvG in Arles here: PART 1, PART 2, PART 3). At last I get to meet Mrs Roulin in person.

It has VvG’s signature too.

And of course for Aina, a mandatory pose with the man himself … self-portrait from 1887-88.

An art gallery is truly a place of calm and serenity. Well, it’s a temple, sort of. I never grow tired of its ambience … provided there are not too many people around.

The New York Metropolitan Museum of Art — a must for art lovers and non-art lovers alike. Visit it!

Before we leave, a couple of masterpieces from Paul Gauguin, a housemate of Vincent van Gogh’s in Arles, till something happened between them that made VvG cut his own ear! Below, “Still Life with Teapot and Fruit” 1896, “The Siesta” 1892-94. Lovely!

At the eastern edge of Manhattan along the East River, there’s the venerable United Nations Headquarters (completed in 1952), and this is the 39-storey Secretariat Tower. It’s lunchtime, and diplomats and staff are thronging the gate to exit the compound.

Next to the tower, the General Assembly Building, adorned with flags of the 193 member-nations.

Here we decide to touch base with a dear diplomat-friend, His Excellency the Malaysian Ambassador to the Sudan, Mr Ashri Muda, at his apartment just around the corner from the UN HQ. Well he is in NYC, instead of in Khartoum, on a short-term assignment with the Malaysian Mission at the United Nations. In any case, we wish to thank Ashri for the wonderful lunch! We promise to visit him in Khartoum next March. 😉

Just a few blocks west of the UN HQ, the beautiful New York Public Library. Established in 1895, it has 53 million items, the 2nd largest library in the USA (behind the Library of Congress in Washington, DC), and 3rd largest in the whole world. This majestic main building was completed in 1910.

The main lobby on the ground floor — in the 2004 apocalyptic movie “The Day After Tomorrow”, a huge mass of water comes crashing through these glasses, with people fleeing to the upper floors of the library for safety.

The beautiful McGraw Rotunda with the grand entrance to the research area.

Now this is what I call a library!

Whenever you are in NYC, this is something you should do. Take the Statten Island ferry at Battery Park at the southern tip of Manhattan. This is a free ferry, so just hop on together with regular commuters and fellow visitors, and enjoy the ride. The view of Lower Manhattan is fantastic, where the newly-built One World Trade Centre dominates the skyline. It’s built on the site of the former twin towers of World Trade Centre, tragically destroyed by the horrible 9/11 attacks in 2001.

The attraction of this Statten Island ferry is simple — it gives you a free tour of the Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island. How close you get to the Lady depends on the captain of the boat. She has been there since 1886, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The torch is 93m from the ground.

In any case you get two chances to get close to it, since once you get to Statten Island, you have to disembark and reboard the ferry for the return trip to Manhattan. Not bad for a free tour of the Statue of Liberty.

Time to go home and back to the subway. The New York subway is legendary, began operation in 1904, it has the most stations in the world, but 7th busiest in the world, behind Tokyo, Seoul, Moscow, Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou. We have ridden Tokyo, Seoul, Moscow and Shanghai, and yes, they are excellent.

The NYC subway stations are generally not pretty, and not as shiny as their Tokyo or Seoul counterparts, but the service is quite efficient and cheap. In short it gets the job done, which is great for New Yorkers.

We exit at a rather modern station in the borough of Queens, so it looks rather different to the older stations in Manhattan.

A few days in NYC and we are ready to depart for our next destination. We decide to take Megabus which is a pretty good intercity service at a great price. What we haven’t bargained for is the fact that in some cities, Megabus does not use the proper terminals — it uses the streets, even in NYC. Luckily the weather is great today, a bit cold, but I can’t imagine people queuing here in the rain, sleet or snow!

From my comfy seat in the lower deck of the bus, I say good-bye to NYC … we’ll be back in two weeks’ time, but Philadelphia is next!

> THE END

Kuala Lumpur KUL to New York JFK, with Kuwait Airways

16 November 2013

A long journey we just did, Kuala Lumpur to New York City with Kuwait Airways. Inevitably we had to change planes in Kuwait, followed by a brief stopover in London, culminating in a 28-hour flight. Actually the plane departed KUL at 3am on Saturday and landed at JFK at 6pm same day, so that’s a bit of time-travelling, right? Ah well, Kuwait Airways gave us a great deal, and furthermore we had not tried the carrier … so why not? 🙂

The journey at KUL starts at 3.00am. Nothing strange, middle-eastern airlines like to leave Malaysia in the wee hours of the morning. I guess to arrive at their home bases in time for breakfast. This is an Airbus A340-300, procured by the airline way back in 1995, thus making our youngest child Aina, a fellow traveller, younger by two years!

The interior is not in tip-top condition, some seats a bit shabby and loose, not helped by the cranky ancient inflight entertainment system. I wonder why a rich state like Kuwait is missing out on the latest jetliners, unlike their other Gulf brethren … I suppose being a govt-owned enterprise has a lot to do with it, but that’s another story. I pity the cabin crew though, who seem to be trying their level best to make us comfortable.

In any case, the stuff they feed us are pretty good.

And for this leg of the journey (Kuala Lumpur to Kuwait), we have a second helping in the form of breakfast just before arrival.

Kuwait Airport looks like a shopping mall, but it’s not too large to make one disoriented. It’s not too busy, and there seem to be a lot of Filipino and Indonesian ladies around. 🙂

It has three wings, but the lay-out is pretty much straightforward. I was last here in 2006 on a business trip, so the airport was just a blur.

It’s funny how the elongated concourse’s ceiling is designed like the cabin of a huge plane. Sort of pre-flight orientation.

In any case, there’s a display of what they plan to have, but I can’t see any construction activity outside the present terminal building. Another Kuwaiti wishful thinking? Are they sleeping through the aviation boom raging across the Gulf now?

For us travellers on a lengthy lay-over, free wi-fi is a necessity, and we find it at Gate 1, at the far end of one of the wings. Luckily it’s early morning and this god-forsaken gate is forgotten, so we have the space to ourselves.

Impressive huge billboards adorn the wall at this end, extolling the virtues of Kuwait … but Kuwait has been so low profile, that most of us would have no clue what this little country is all about. We only know it was invaded by Saddam Hussein in the first Gulf War, who stole all their planes.

Morning sun in full shine, and a bit of plane-spotting — another ancient Kuwaiti plane, an Airbus A300-600 from 1994. Their fleet is full of old planes, some from the early 90s (bought new after the first Gulf War, when Saddam decimated their fleet). Only last month I heard their government was thinking of upgrading their fleet with brand new planes, but then it is now mired in controversy. Politicians should not be running airlines!

And yes, our ride to New York City via London is ready … well, a relatively new Boeing 777-200 from 1998. Now at least Aina is older by a year.

Taxiing to the runway for take-off takes a while, since the distance is quite far. The terminal and runways are designed in such a way that this distance is not minimised. A pity.

The interior is similar to the A340 we took from Kuala Lumpur earlier, but I must admit, the leg room in both planes is quite generous.

As soon as we are airborne, they start feeding us again.

Almost 6 hours after leaving Kuwait, we start our approach for London Heathrow.

Flying over London, that’s the City Airport along the Thames river.

Soon we are right above the Canary Wharf area.

Safely on the ground at London Heathrow, and a lot of red planes.

Terminal 4 is our station. Malaysia Airlines also uses this terminal.

We are travelling on to New York, but are requested to disembark, taking all cabin baggage with us — a real hassle. We duly leave the plane, and follow the transit sign to re-enter the departure area, and yes, through another round of stringent security check. I fail the normal scan, and need to go into a cubicle where the use the body scanner. No problem, quick and painless, but I wonder what they see on my body …

This is one very busy airport, I must say.

Back to the gate where our plane is docked, and as usual, a bit of plane-watching — and a brand new one, Qatar’s Boeing 787, the Dreamliner.

The old faithful from Kuwait that would take us across the Atlantic Ocean to New York City, patiently waits.

Boarding time again, with some new passengers joining us here in London.

Airborne and the sun sets as we are crossing the Atlantic. Pardon this antiquated Airshow display!

Aina ponders … this is her first visit to America. Quite a milestone, and country no. 21 for her too — not bad for a 16-year-old girl.

Another round of meal before we land on American soil.

The plane land on schedule at JFK, the immigration crowd is thin, and we are lucky the officer is friendly, and after the usual fingerprinting and banter, we get our entry visae … soon we are at the back of the famous NY yellow cab on the way to our hotel, just half an hour from the airport. Excellent start, despite the cab hitting a car in the traffic jam along Van Wyck Expressway, causing a half-hour delay in our hotel journey!

 

 > TO BE CONTINUED

Niagara Falls, USA

USA > New York State > Niagara Falls

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After publishing my recent story about Niagara Falls, Canada (see HERE), I thought it’d be appropriate to complement it with this one: my visit to Niagara Falls on the US side, more than 2 years ago. You can decide which is more worthy to visit: Niagara Falls Canada or Niagara Falls USA. 🙂

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Nov 2008

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A cold spell has been sweeping upstate New York, with extremely low temperatures during the night.

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On this very cold morning, I find myself heading westwards along Interstate 90. It is the longest interstate highway in the USA, at 5000km long. It links Boston and Seattle, and is also the northernmost coast-to-coast American highway.

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At certain stretches, it is snowing heavily, but New Yorkers drive their cars fast, and we are having a hard time keeping up with them.

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The huge North American trucks can be intimidating because of their size and speed. They can easily outpace a car.

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Niagara Falls at last, but the weather remains nasty.

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Opposite the public car park, the Niagara Center.

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There’s a Hard Rock Cafe nearby.

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Parkland separates the town and the Niagara Falls visitor centre, and they fly the Canadian flag here too.

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It’s still late autumn, I suppose.

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These are truly hardy plants.

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The Niagara Falls (USA) Visitor Center — I think the Canadian one is grander.

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Interior of the Visitor Center.

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A map to put everything into perspective, just that left is North. Please look extreme left, note that there are two falls: American Falls (in USA), and Horseshoe Falls (straddling USA/Canada border — the Canadians call it Canadian Falls for obvious reason).

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A proper map, showing Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. The Niagara Falls water actually flows from Lake Erie into Lake Ontario to the north.

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Past the Visitor Centre, access to the parklands surrounding the falls. I can hear the roar of the falls.

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It’s really cold, probably -5C, no kidding.

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Past the woods, I see the Niagara River going over the American Falls, with the skyline of Niagara Falls Canada in the background.

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Walking along the bank, the water gets ferocious and noisy. The roar of the American Falls can be deafening.

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And there it is … American Falls. Not so spectacular on this side, but on the Canadian side, it should be a great show.

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The American Falls are 320m wide and about 30m high.

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Looks dull and bleak on the Canadian side, with the drab-looking defunct Ontario Power Station just above the river water-line.

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The famous Skylon Tower at 160m (above street level), opened 1965, it has restaurants and observation deck. Everything you see across the river is Canadian.

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Below the street, the Maid of the Mist boats are having a break. In warmer months, they would take visitors to the bases of the falls.

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Looking northwards, there’s the Rainbow Bridge, connecting USA and Canada — 290m long, built 1941.

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Across the water, one finds Goat Island in the middle of Niagara River atop the two huge falls, and this is the bridge to access it.

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To my surprise, even on a freezing weekday like today’s, there are visitors on Goat Island. Yes, somebody reared a herd of goats here once.

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It’s now an uninhabited protected state park.

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A curiosity I find on desolate Goat Island is a statue of the much-maligned genius Nikola Tesla.

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Tesla (1856-1943) and Westinghouse won the contract to start supplying alternating current (AC) to North America via a hydro power plant here at Niagara Falls. They beat bitter rivals Edison and General Electric with their direct current (DC) proposal. Some say Edison is a bad guy, but I digress.

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He looks miserable in this sub-zero weather, but as they say, a cat has nine lives.

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This is the ‘highlight’ of Niagara Falls USA — the Terrapin Point lookout. I can only see the water dropping down the awesome Horseshoe Falls, but not the whole spectacular show. For that, one has to hop over to the Canadian side, which I can’t do today since I don’t have the friggin’ Canadian visa. Before 9-11, a Malaysian passport-holder can just walk over into Canada without a visa.

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Only the top portion of Horseshoe (Canadian) Falls can be seen from this vantage point. On the other side, next to the falls, the Niagara Falls Canada visitor centre.

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Below the Niagara Parkway, the Ontario Power Station, decommissioned 1999.

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At Goat Island, a nice view of American Falls and the Rainbow Bridge. Canada to the left of river, USA to the right.

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Very nice place, Goat Island is, but unfortunately I have to leave.

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Buffalo is next stop, and the weather has turned for the better, but getting colder, as we drive away.

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> THE END

 

RETRO: Hiroshima and Enola Gay

[ originally published at http://mny.nuraina.com/index.php?itemid=7 ]

Tuesday, 6th November 2008

RETRO: Hiroshima and Enola Gay

Last week Brig Gen Paul W Tibbets, Jr, died at 92 years of age.


Source: Salt Lake Tribune

Which brings me back memories of my own pilgrimage to Hiroshima. It was Aug, 2004, during a trip to Japan …

I start my journey at Tokyo station, boarding a bullet train to Kyoto, en route to Hiroshima.

I finally set foot in modern Hiroshima, on a hot balmy night of Aug 8, 2004, just 2 days after the 59th anniversary of that dreadful event.

The next day, in the sweltering heat, I board a tram …

… along the wide streets of Hiroshima. The place was built from scratch after the 1945 obliteration, and reminds me of any modern western city, with blocks and wide roads. For example, Adelaide (Australia) comes to mind immediately.

The tram soon deposits me at the doorstep of a very famous landmark, the A-Bomb Dome.

A tragic tale unfolds.

This is how it looked 2 months after the bombing, in Oct 1945. Note the A-Bomb Dome, then a Hall.

Another view of the Dome/Hall.

A hundred metres up the road, near the epicentre of the explosion, I squint at the blue sky, imagining the A-Bomb detonating some 580m up. The weather on that fateful day of 6th Aug, 1945, must have been very similar to today’s – hot, humid, clear blue sky. Visualise a blinding flash of intense white light up there …

Fast-forward to Feb 2005, six months later. I’m in Washington DC, USA, and with time to kill, decide to pay the well-regarded Steven F Udvar-Hazy Center at Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum annex, near Washington Dulles International Airport. I spot something familiar ….

Yes, it’s The Culprit, the Enola Gay, the machine which brought hell to the folks in Hiroshima – she was there, lurking in the sky, that fateful morning of 6th Aug, 1945.

To the right, a slender carpark is seen. The A-Bomb detonated 580m somewhere above the spot where this carpark is.

And it was delivered by this creature, a Boeing B29 Superfortress, now sitting harmlessly in its den on the other side of the planet.

I feel like being eyeballed by a monster. It’s both eerie and spooky. Just six months ago I witnessed the remnants of utter destruction it caused 60 years ago.

At the A-Bomb Memorial Park, the Japanese flag is perpetually at half-mast.

The focal point of the park is this memorial.

People come to lay wreaths and pay respect to the dead.

The Culprit is like a knight gleaming in silvery armour.

Poignant juxtaposition.

Nearby, there’s a nice museum, with a great view to boot. Note the carpark building ‘P’ to the right, which marks the spot where the A-Bomb exploded 580m up.

Inside the museum, sobering exhibits. Instantaneous destruction.


The T-shaped bridge above is the target for Enola Gay to drop it’s deadly load, and here it is today.

Another display: before, … (note the T-shaped bridge for orientation)

… and after.

The A-Bomb exploded (red ball) almost above the T-shaped bridge. Excellent aiming by Enola Gay.

Survivors, but not for long.

Fused ink bottles found at a decimated factory.

Intense heat melted and fused glasses.

“Letters of Protest” against the use of the A-Bomb, from all over the world, adorn the wall.

A letter from Nehru.

Names of the (identifiable) dead. Estimated dead: 70,000 instantaneously, another 70,000 due to injuries and radiation.

I’ve had enough, and on the way out, take a final look at the forlorn Dome.

At the Smithsonian, I take a finally gaze at Enola Gay. It brings a closure for me, after the Hiroshima visit 6 months ago.

After the traumatic trip to the A-Bomb Park, I take a short train ride to the sacred Shinto island of Miyajima, for a bit of therapy. 🙂

Soon I am on another bullet train for another destination, but that’s another tale.

EPILOGUE

Source: inRich.com

Please visit HIROSHIMA REMEMBERED. Thanks!

> THE END

RELATED STORY IS HERE.


RETRO: Hiroshima and Enola Gay

RETRO: Hiroshima and Enola Gay


Almost 3 years ago Brig Gen Paul W Tibbets, Jr, died at 92 years of age.


Source: Salt Lake Tribune

Which brings me back memories of my own pilgrimage to Hiroshima. It was Aug, 2004, during a trip to Japan …

I start my journey at Tokyo station, boarding a bullet train to Kyoto, en route to Hiroshima.

I finally set foot in modern Hiroshima, on a hot balmy night of Aug 8, 2004, just 2 days after the 59th anniversary of that dreadful event.

The next day, in the sweltering heat, I board a tram …

… along the wide streets of Hiroshima. The place was built from scratch after the 1945 obliteration, and reminds me of any modern western city, with blocks and wide roads. For example, Adelaide (Australia) comes to mind immediately.

The tram soon deposits me at the doorstep of a very famous landmark, the A-Bomb Dome.

A tragic tale unfolds.

This is how it looked 2 months after the bombing, in Oct 1945. Note the A-Bomb Dome, then a Hall.

Another view of the Dome/Hall.

A hundred metres up the road, near the epicentre of the explosion, I squint at the blue sky, imagining the A-Bomb detonating some 580m up. The weather on that fateful day of 6th Aug, 1945, must have been very similar to today’s – hot, humid, clear blue sky. Visualise a blinding flash of intense white light up there …

Fast-forward to Feb 2005, six months later. I’m in Washington DC, USA, and with time to kill, decide to pay the well-regarded Steven F Udvar-Hazy Center at Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum annex, near Washington Dulles International Airport. I spot something familiar ….

Yes, it’s The Culprit, the Enola Gay, the machine which brought hell to the folks in Hiroshima – she was there, lurking in the sky, that fateful morning of 6th Aug, 1945.

To the right, a slender carpark is seen. The A-Bomb detonated 580m somewhere above the spot where this carpark is.

And it was delivered by this creature, a Boeing B29 Superfortress, now sitting harmlessly in its den on the other side of the planet.

I feel like being eyeballed by a monster. It’s both eerie and spooky. Just six months ago I witnessed the remnants of utter destruction it caused 60 years ago.

At the A-Bomb Memorial Park, the Japanese flag is perpetually at half-mast.

The focal point of the park is this memorial.

People come to lay wreaths and pay respect to the dead.

The Culprit is like a knight gleaming in silvery armour.

Poignant juxtaposition.

Nearby, there’s a nice museum, with a great view to boot. Note the carpark building ‘P’ to the right, which marks the spot where the A-Bomb exploded 580m up.

Inside the museum, sobering exhibits. Instantaneous destruction.


The T-shaped bridge above is the target for Enola Gay to drop it’s deadly load, and here it is today.

Another display: before, … (note the T-shaped bridge for orientation)

… and after.

The A-Bomb exploded (red ball) almost above the T-shaped bridge. Excellent aiming by Enola Gay.

Survivors, but not for long.

Fused ink bottles found at a decimated factory.

Intense heat melted and fused glasses.

“Letters of Protest” against the use of the A-Bomb, from all over the world, adorn the wall.

A letter from Nehru.

Names of the (identifiable) dead. Estimated dead: 70,000 instantaneously, another 70,000 due to injuries and radiation.

I’ve had enough, and on the way out, take a final look at the forlorn Dome.

At the Smithsonian, I take a finally gaze at Enola Gay. It brings a closure for me, after the Hiroshima visit 6 months ago.

After the traumatic trip to the A-Bomb Park, I take a short train ride to the sacred Shinto island of Miyajima, for a bit of therapy. 🙂

Soon I am on another bullet train for another destination, but that’s another tale.

EPILOGUE

Source: inRich.com

Please visit HIROSHIMA REMEMBERED. Thanks!

> THE END

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